Showing posts tagged food systems.
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Who is Debbie So?   Curriculum Vitae   Portfolio   LinkedIn   

Urban strategist in London who loves social innovation, sustainable design, the future of china, and treehouses.

The geospatialized meanderings of a pizza through the city and hinterland

Source: http://pruned.blogspot.co.uk/

— 1 year ago with 1 note

#pizza  #food systems  #cities 
Pousse le béton

Jamie Ross collaboration with Jonas Gilbert. Five images are postered on walls in the neighbourhood targeted by the Quartier 21 project in the West End of Montreal.

…in places of decreased human surveillance, non-human actors actively express themselves on the urban environment with a powerful creative agency. It is these plant species - weeds, mauvaises herbes - terms which verify the conotative judgement made on their value, that have a great capacity to make the city more sustainable. Plant life, especially that unplanned by humans, reduce the heat island effect, improve water management and provide habitat for other animals. Comestible wild plants provide a tasty source of free, local, healthy food.

The importance of people is primordial in the creation of place, and it is something very powerful when definitions of place cease to be dependent on human-centered notions of personhood and agency. An invasive tree pushes back against the fence, allowing foxes to pass through new gaps. Informing and familiarizing human city residents of the lives and habits of those with whom we share space, and educating the public of their uses and histories is a powerful gesture that has the ability to completely revolutionize the way people understand the city as within, rather than opposed to the category of ‘nature’. Inclusion of the names of plants in the languages of Science, of European settlement and of the aboriginal inhabitants of the Montreal area is equally important, as it highlights the various communities’ interaction with these species.

— 2 years ago with 1 note

#montreal  #art  #food systems  #friends 
The Happening!

Last Thursday July 21st was a memorably day at Santropol Roulant.  We unveiled our new rooftop garden and urban agriculture demonstration site with a press conference in the morning and a party - aptly named “the happening” - that night.

Below is a sampling of the media coverage we received!

Shaun and I giving a workshop on urban beekeeping at The Happening.


1) Full page articles in the “Metro” and “24 Heures”

http://www.journalmetro.com/montreal/article/923052—santropol-roulant-se-dote-d-un-jardin-sur-le-toit
http://www.24hmontreal.canoe.ca/24hmontreal/actualites/archives/2011/07/20110721-135623.html

2) Brief in the Mirror (scroll to 3rd story)
http://www.montrealmirror.com/wp/2011/07/21/the-front-45/

3) Featured story on CTV’s Sunday Bite
http://tinyurl.com/sundaybite

4) Featured interview on CBC Radio’s Drive Home Show Homerun and mention the next morning on DayBreak

5)
Highlighted on blogs including:

Montreal City Weblog: http://w5.montreal.com/mtlweblog/?p=11681
The Mindful Table: http://www.mindfultable.ca/2011/07/santropol-roulant-unveils-rooftop-garden/


View of the rooftop garden at Santropol Roulant. (Over 30 types of vegetables!)

— 3 years ago with 3 notes

#montreal  #urban interventions  #food systems 
Mogro: Eliminating Food Deserts

You’ve heard of food trucks and green carts. Now there’s a building momentum around mobile supermarkets that can tackle the country’s food deserts.

Rick Schnieders grew up working in a little grocery store in Iowa and worked for years with Sysco, the United States’ largest food distributor, until retiring a year and a half ago. He admits that he doesn’t play golf or own a boat, so he’s making the most out of retirement with a for-profit company called Mogro

The mobile grocer started trucking in groceries in a 33-foot long trailer—10 full bays with 200 supermarket items—in Santo Domingo Pueblo, a Native American community in New Mexico. It’s basically a beer trailer with added refrigeration. Shopping there is sort of like walking through an outdoor grocery store, albeit one with only two aisles and no chips, soda, or candy bars.

What also makes Mogro different from other mobile food banks and grocers-on-wheels is that it stocks more than just fruits and vegetables. Schnieders doesn’t think there’s a high enough return on produce to make that venture economically sustainable. In the long-run, perhaps the business could be a model for filling in the gaps that make food deserts—access to healthy affordable food.

This is what I’m talking about! I’ve posted before about food deserts and Michelle Obama’s campaign to eliminate them as part of Let’s Move. Access to food is a huge deal to me - I love to eat and I believe that access to healthy foods is a basic right. Mogro is taking a stand against the big-box supermarkets that are located too far away, are too expensive, and are full of crummy produce that comes from who knows where. When we think about reversing the trend of suburbanization and poorly thought urban sprawl, Mogro is part of the solution.

— 3 years ago with 6 notes

#food systems  #cities  #food deserts 
The HFFI working group defines a food desert as a low-income census          tract where a substantial number or share of residents has low          access to a supermarket or large grocery store:
 To qualify as a “low-income community,” a census tract            must have either: 1) a poverty rate of 20 percent or higher, OR 2) a            median family income at or below 80 percent of the area’s median family            income; 
 To qualify as a “low-access community,” at least 500            people and/or at least 33 percent of the census tract’s population must            reside more than one mile from a supermarket or large grocery store            (for rural census tracts, the distance is more than 10 miles). 
From the Food Deserts Locator.

The HFFI working group defines a food desert as a low-income census tract where a substantial number or share of residents has low access to a supermarket or large grocery store:

  • To qualify as a “low-income community,” a census tract must have either: 1) a poverty rate of 20 percent or higher, OR 2) a median family income at or below 80 percent of the area’s median family income;
  • To qualify as a “low-access community,” at least 500 people and/or at least 33 percent of the census tract’s population must reside more than one mile from a supermarket or large grocery store (for rural census tracts, the distance is more than 10 miles).

From the Food Deserts Locator.

— 3 years ago

#food systems 
The Food Deserts Locator. 

Part of the First Lady’s Let’s          Move! initiative, the proposed Healthy Food Financing Initiative          (HFFI) will expand the availability of nutritious food to food deserts—low-income          communities without ready access to healthy and affordable food—by          developing and equipping grocery stores, small retailers, corner stores,          and farmers markets with fresh and healthy food. The HFFI is a partnership          between the Treasury Department, Health and Human Services, and the Agriculture          Department (USDA). An Interagency Working Group from the three departments,          along with staff from the Economic Research Service (ERS/USDA), developed          a definition of food deserts to be used in determining eligibility for          HFFI funds.

This thing is amazing! I think it’s amazing step for the Let’s Move Campaign and for the health of people everywhere. If you’ve ever driven through the US, it is ultimately the most frustrating thing that the only thing you can find to eat is potatoes and hamburgers.
Access to healthy food is so crucial and so spatial. A lot of supermarket chains avoid these lower-income, ethnic neighborhoods because they are perceived as “higher risk”. What you get instead are swaths of neighborhoods that have unlimited access to fast food and liquor shops, because that’s their proper “target market”.
Let’s make it better!

The Food Deserts Locator.

Part of the First Lady’s Let’s Move! initiative, the proposed Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI) will expand the availability of nutritious food to food deserts—low-income communities without ready access to healthy and affordable food—by developing and equipping grocery stores, small retailers, corner stores, and farmers markets with fresh and healthy food. The HFFI is a partnership between the Treasury Department, Health and Human Services, and the Agriculture Department (USDA). An Interagency Working Group from the three departments, along with staff from the Economic Research Service (ERS/USDA), developed a definition of food deserts to be used in determining eligibility for HFFI funds.

This thing is amazing! I think it’s amazing step for the Let’s Move Campaign and for the health of people everywhere. If you’ve ever driven through the US, it is ultimately the most frustrating thing that the only thing you can find to eat is potatoes and hamburgers.

Access to healthy food is so crucial and so spatial. A lot of supermarket chains avoid these lower-income, ethnic neighborhoods because they are perceived as “higher risk”. What you get instead are swaths of neighborhoods that have unlimited access to fast food and liquor shops, because that’s their proper “target market”.

Let’s make it better!

— 3 years ago with 9 notes

#food systems  #urban planning 
For all Montrealers -
There is a huge tomato/plant seedling sale this saturday/sunday in the mile end. Stop by 5045 de l’Esplanade and check it out! More information here.


THE BIG TOMATO SALE EVENT
Saturday May 27-Sunday May 28
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Delicious and beautiful vegetable, herb and flower seedlings.
Over 50 varieties of heirloom tomato plants.
Rare and unusual varieties not easily found elsewhere.
Grown without any chemical fertilizers or pesticides.
Ready for your garden bed or container.

For all Montrealers -

There is a huge tomato/plant seedling sale this saturday/sunday in the mile end. Stop by 5045 de l’Esplanade and check it out! More information here.

THE BIG TOMATO SALE EVENT

Saturday May 27-Sunday May 28

10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Delicious and beautiful vegetable, herb and flower seedlings.

Over 50 varieties of heirloom tomato plants.

Rare and unusual varieties not easily found elsewhere.

Grown without any chemical fertilizers or pesticides.

Ready for your garden bed or container.

— 3 years ago with 15 notes

#food systems  #montreal  #event 
“What’s in Season, New York” is a chart representing the months in which different fruits and  vegetables are in season within a 200 mile radius of New York City.

“What’s in Season, New York” is a chart representing the months in which different fruits and vegetables are in season within a 200 mile radius of New York City.

— 3 years ago with 1 note

#food systems  #new york 
Dr. Arnold re-purposes abandoned infrastructure as a site for  myco-agriculture. The  Li-Sun Exotic Mushroom Farm is an abandoned train tunnel which now hosts an array of mushrooms. The tunnel itself is about 650 metres long and about 30 metres deep. Buried under solid rock and  deprived of the New South Wales sunshine, the temperature holds at a  steady 15º Celsius. Read more about this at Edible Geography.

Dr. Arnold re-purposes abandoned infrastructure as a site for myco-agriculture. The Li-Sun Exotic Mushroom Farm is an abandoned train tunnel which now hosts an array of mushrooms. The tunnel itself is about 650 metres long and about 30 metres deep. Buried under solid rock and deprived of the New South Wales sunshine, the temperature holds at a steady 15º Celsius. Read more about this at Edible Geography.

— 3 years ago

#food systems  #urban  #re-purposed space